Guaranteed Jobs, Hungarian Style

In a recent blog post, Niskanen Center’s Samuel Hammond expressed skepticism about the idea of job guarantees. In his view, such policies do not attack the real problem, they are easily politicized, and, as active labor market policy, are inferior to wage subsidies for private sector jobs.

To see how guaranteed jobs work out in practice, we need look no farther than Hungary, where Prime Minister Viktor Orban has made the replacement of welfare by workfare a centerpiece of the claimed Hungarian economic miracle that helped him win re-election in last Sunday’s election.

Writing recently for The New York Times, Patrick Kingsley and Benjamin Novak provide an overview of job guarantees, Hungarian style. Their article, which focuses on a small village in which 73 of 472 residents participate in the program, makes an effort to show both the positive and negative side of workfare. They note that although the guaranteed jobs pay only about half the minimum wage, that is twice what participants previously received in unemployment benefits. Participants told them that the pay, although minimal, was enough to make a difference. The program has also brought some small but welcome improvements in the town’s infrastructure.

“This little bit of money goes a long way in this village,” said Eva Petrovics, 60 who helps to clean the village nursery school. “The fridge is full now.”

The program has also helped to spruce up the village. Since 2012, workfare participants have built a small bridge, added a drainage system, and renovated the town hall and sports fields.

However, there are downsides to workfare, too. Hammond’s concerns about politicization seem to have been borne out. Kingsley and Novak note that the program have made participants more dependent on Orban’s Fidezs party, which is expected to retain power in this weekend’s election, and on the town’s mayor, who determines job assignments.

Moreover, despite better drainage and tidier soccer fields, workfare participants do not really put in all that much time doing useful work. Often, they report to work for an hour or so and then go home. There is especially little to do in winter.

Popular though it may be in the Hungarian countryside, Orban’s workfare policy has many critics, both in Hungary and in Western Europe. Annamária Artner is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic and Regional Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Writing for the progressive website Social Europe, headquartered in London, Artner maintains that

The implied threat of the punitive workfare regime is effectively sweeping the unemployed under the carpet. The unemployment insurance system in Hungary, introduced in the early 1990s following the transition to a market economy, effectively no longer exists.

Reposted from NiskanenCenter.com.