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Study of Urban vs. Suburban Emissions Strengthens Case for a Carbon Tax

Environmentalists have long been critical of “suburban sprawl.” A study of carbon emissions in Salt Lake City and surrounding areas, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides new reasons to question excessive suburban growth. Although the study itself does not make policy recommendations, its findings bolster the case for a carbon tax. The study was Read More


New Advances in Genetic Testing Further Undermine the Insurability of Healthcare Risks

 To be insurable, a risk must meet certain criteria. One is that the loss must not be catastrophic. Another is that the loss must be unexpected or accidental. Genetic testing renders many health risks uninsurable. For example, about 30,000 people in the United States have two copies of the gene that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Treatment for CF is improving. Read More


“Medicare Extra” Shows the Convergence of Progressive and Conservative Healthcare Thinking

In public debate, progressives and conservatives often seem poles apart. Yet, behind the scenes, when pragmatic reformers take on a problem, their conclusions often converge, regardless of their political starting points. The Medicare Extra proposal recently released by the Center for American Progress (CAP) is a case in point. Filtering out any ideological language, Medicare Extra bears a strong resemblance to Read More


Is There Any Real Political Appetite for Healthcare Reform?

Healthcare reformers spend a lot of time thinking about what a better healthcare system might look like, but they also need to pay attention to what kinds of reform, if any, people really want. The latest polling data from the Kaiser Family Foundation suggest that there is still a real appetite for reform, provided it is framed properly. Here are Read More


The Chickens Come Home to Roost: EPA Seeks to Weaken Fuel Economy Standards as New Car Prices Soar

On Monday, the EPA announced that it is is getting ready to  relax the ambitious automotive fuel economy standards (CAFE standards) that were set during the Obama administration. Those standards would have required new cars sold in 2025 to average more than 50 miles per gallon. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt said that the Obama administration had set the standards “too Read More